Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Atlantic Canada


THE STORY CONTINUES WITH THESE SALTWIRE VIDEOS

Unama’ki Mi’kmaw communities to mark first holiday to commemorate children from residential schools

Not a day goes by that Noah Matthews-Cremo sees a reminder of the continuing legacy of the residential school system in his community of Membertou.

The 19-year-old, who recently started the nursing program at Cape Breton University, spends much of his free time learning his Mi’kmaw language and culture.

“I see our language holders disappearing without any new ones being born. Stories, dances, songs, prayers, teachings, crafts, lessons, values, knowledge – they are all on the verge of extinction, crushing me under the pressure of knowing that if I don’t learn it now, it will be gone forever, “he said.

Hundreds of people gathered in Sydney on Canada Day for a march in honor of residential school survivors and victims. People will again commemorate the survivors and victims of the residential school system on Thursday, the first annual National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. ARDELLE REYNOLDS • CAPE BRETON POST

Here’s how you can mark Truth and Reconciliation Day in Halifax

The Halifax waterfront will host a series of events marking Canada’s first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

There is no shortage of options for visitors to learn more about Mi’kmaq culture. Crafts, live performances, and educational videos are just a few of what the Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Center has in store for Haligonians starting this Thursday, September 30.

“It’s a real opportunity for community members to come out, engage with the indigenous community and get something out of it. And I hope that we are building a true understanding of the landscape of Indigenous peoples in Halifax, ”said Pam Glode Desrochers, Executive Director of the center.

“Good Medicine for the Community”: National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Millbrook

Watching how the Millbrook First Nation unites to commemorate the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on September 30, Renae Julien is proud.

“It’s a good day to learn, and also to reflect on it,” said the community member. “It’s painful for some and it heals for some, there are so many different emotions going into it. But I’m really proud of my community here in Millbrook because of what they’re going to do.

On the powwow field, “The Relatives” performs and Subway offers a feast. There will be a sacred healing fire, youth rock painting and a ribbon shirt demonstration by Sunshine Martin.

National Truth and Reconciliation Day commemorates and honors Indigenous residential school survivors and the impact on subsequent generations.
National Truth and Reconciliation Day commemorates and honors Indigenous residential school survivors and the impact on subsequent generations.

LETTER: Government of Newfoundland and Labrador must review its own actions with Indigenous peoples

The federal government’s introduction of National Truth and Reconciliation Day as a statutory holiday is another attempt to bring to the fore the history and status of Indigenous peoples in Canada. We are invited to examine our knowledge, understanding, attitudes and behavior towards Indigenous peoples.

In light of September 30, our provincial government must review its own policies and actions.

In 2020, the province changed the public holiday of June 24 from “Discovery Day” to “June Feast”. He also promised to choose a new name in consultation with indigenous organizations. We need an update on this.

Confederation BuildingKeith Gosse / The Telegram
Confederation BuildingKeith Gosse / The Telegram

JARVIS GOOGOO: Sincere Signs of Truth and Reconciliation in Atlantic Canada

Jarvis Googoo grew up in We’koqma’q, Unama’kik, attended an Indian Day School and graduated from a Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey school. He holds degrees from Saint Mary’s University (cum laude), Dalhousie Law School, and is a non-practicing member of the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society. He lives in Kjipuktuk / Dartmouth, Nova Scotia with his wife Kerrianne and their dog Looloo. Follow him on Twitter: @JarvisGoogoo

In July, a new welcome sign was placed on Canso Causeway in addition to the “Welcome to Cape Breton” sign. It reads “Pjila’si Unama’kik”, which is a welcome in the Mi’kmaw language for those who come to the island. Although it has been celebrated by many, it has a few detractors.

Jarvis googoo
Jarvis googoo

About Keith Johnson

Check Also

Karen Kain’s “Swan Lake” soars on romantic wings

First of all, the new vision of “Swan Lake” by Karen Kain of Hamilton for …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.